The All Stars of the K-ON! English Dub

The All Stars of the K-ON! English Dub

The debate between subs and dubs will rage on until we are long gone. In reality, it is an absolutely silly fight as you should watch which version you are more comfortable with and will enjoy better. When I decided to get back into anime in 2013, one show I constantly saw gifs of on Tumblr was of the 2009-2010 series, K-ON!. For whatever reason, I decided upon the Sentai Filmworks English dub of the series (not to be confused with the other English dub that preceded Sentai) and breezed through both seasons and the movie. The performances of the cast are good on their own and accentuated the show for me in many ways. Looking at the cast of the dub today, it is clear that the K-ON! dub should be viewed as an all-star cast and perhaps one of the best dubs of the 2010s.

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From Baby Steps to the Pinnacle of Sports Anime

When I booted up Yakuza 5 for the first time earlier this week, I expected features that were already widely known. Being able to go into a Club Sega and play Virtua Fighter 2 was one that the game features unlike most other open-world games in the genre. It is also a sad commentary that this might be the last time we see a Virtua Fighter game in a Sega release ever, but that’s a different story for another time. One fact of Yakuza 5 that I certainly wasn’t expecting was it for to have the licenses for numerous popular magazines in Japan. Immediately I was drawn to seeing Weekly Famitsu, the popular video game magazine that was once notorious for the strict reviews it gave games. Another magazine that caught my eye, especially its cover, was of Weekly Shonen Magazine. On the in-game cover is a big feature on Fairy Tail, but in the corner I spied what looked like Baby Steps’ Eiichiro and Natsu. 

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Why Do Certain Anime Adaptations of Manga Feel So Incomplete?

Something that has recently made its way into my nightly routine is reading various manga. Thanks to the huge screen on the iPhone 6 Plus, it’s extremely convenient to sit and read anything on it. Manga especially has become easy to read, with the art and speech bubbles being very clear to read. Most of my manga reading has come through the Crunchyroll Manga app, or by rediscovering shows I had previously watched and finally gotten around to seeing how they actually end. Which led me to the question, why do certain anime adaptations of manga only cover a fraction of a manga?

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